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livvyplaysfinalfantasy:

Every single time, I feel compelled to express my love for this scene. When I first watched it, I thought it was going to be Yuna enduring harassment from the Luca Goers and Tidus stepping in to save her. As it turns out, literally the exact opposite thing happens: Yuna steps in to defend Tidus from insults taken straight from a bad sports anime.

livvyplaysfinalfantasy:

Tidus eavesdrops on Wakka’s and Lulu’s conversations, which gradually changes from everything to what to do with Yuna’s new guardian-to-be to how Sin has affected their lives.

It’s interesting to contrast this conversation with the previous one on Kilika steps, where neither of them really talks to the other — Wakka is talking to Tidus about Sin, then Lulu bursts in with “you make up one theory after another!” and stalks off ranting, then Wakka confides to Tidus that “I could never be what Chappu was.”

Here, they’re actually listening to one another, despite frictions, and Wakka voices a few objections.

I feel like he becomes a little more assertive after the tournament, but maybe it started here. He’s no longer the junior guardian in quite the way he was before, although Tidus still hasn’t officially joined.

mintywolf:

Woooo so I spent all day porting Guardian to its own tumblr site, which is something I’ve been meaning to do since I started it almost two years ago. (!!!) I might still do some tweaking to it but it’s functional and looks pretty nice. Has a comments section and everything! (This was all a major accomplishment since html is a completely foreign language to me.)
I’ll still be crossposting to dA but I’m hoping this way it’ll be more accessible to my tumblr readers.

mintywolf:

Woooo so I spent all day porting Guardian to its own tumblr site, which is something I’ve been meaning to do since I started it almost two years ago. (!!!) I might still do some tweaking to it but it’s functional and looks pretty nice. Has a comments section and everything! (This was all a major accomplishment since html is a completely foreign language to me.)

I’ll still be crossposting to dA but I’m hoping this way it’ll be more accessible to my tumblr readers.

robynplaysfinalfantasy:

There is a village of Geomancers and Bards on an island in the very center of the map.

The bards sing of the game’s backstory and secrets.

and unlike the DS remake, this fan translation doesn’t attempt to turn it into excruciating doggerel.

robynplaysfinalfantasy:

Speak to the front line soldiers and they’ll tell you that the king of Salonia has divided his army into two and is forcing the two sides to fight.

The two armies just stand here, waiting for a charge that never comes. Only the front lines are even NPCs that you can talk to. The rest are just cardboard cutouts.

Final Fantasy II also struggled with portraying a largescale battle while the player is only commanding a small group. FFII mostly dodges the issue and treats the castle you’re storming like any regular dungeon. Final Fantasy III demotes the battle to scenery.

Granted, you’re not part of the battle in Final Fantasy III, but crossing a battlefield ought to feel a lot more dangerous and chaotic.

Eventually, Final Fantasy IV will get this right.

livvyplaysfinalfantasy:

What makes the dynamic between Wakka and Lulu so intriguing is that they’re two best friends who express their grief in such different (and incompatible) ways. Wakka can’t accept Chappu’s death, while Lulu has become bitter and angry at her loss. Wakka’s “theories” for how Chappu might have survived Sin hurt Lulu just as much as Lulu’s snide and derisive comments hurt Wakka. Their long struggle to overcome their grief and repair their friendship was a great addition to the plot in the first half of the game, although it sadly tapered off closer to the end.

But even Tidus knows not to interfere with whatever’s going on between them here, meaning he’s not completely devoid of tact.

livvyplaysfinalfantasy:

It was Blarr who pointed out to me that Yuna’s reply to Dona’s skepticism can essentially be interpreted as Yuna saying that she has more than just one person who will love her unconditionally.

Of course, this is a very calculated put-down, and it’s an indication that Yuna - a seventeen-year-old girl from a backwater island - has more skill at navigating the complexities of Spira’s sociopolitical sphere than one might first assume. Yet although she’s not quite as naïve as people believe her to be, it’s a bit disappointing that the social finesse we see demonstrated here isn’t utilized more often during X’s plot.

(Source: livvyplaysfinalfantasy)

(Source: fuckyeahbasch, via iamfangu)

livvyplaysfinalfantasy:

Ouch.

(via chitose-the-warrior)